Linus Galleries, Los Angeles Art Shows

2014 Artist Interview Series

Amelia Blair Langford

 Linus Gallery, representing Los Angeles Contemporary Art as well as International art and artists, presents our third interview. The Artist Interview Series is a new blog featuring Linus artists from a variety of different practices and backgrounds. The blog aims to be an enjoyable read, sharing insight into the artist’s creative process and workspace, as well as their view of the world around us. This week we feature talented illustrator Amelia Langford and her thoughts on drawing, the natural world, and the extreme detail of both.

1) Please tell us your name, artistic practice of choice, and location in the world.

 I am Amelia Langford and I make pen and ink illustrations. I currently work and live in Richmond, Virginia.los angeles contemporary art

2) This is a hard choice for many visual artists, but what is the first answer that comes to mind when you think of your favorite color?

My favorite color has changed a lot over the years but right now it would have to be Mustard Yellow. There are little embellishments of it throughout my current body of work and I can’t get enough of it. It’s bring a touch of color to my pen and ink work and reads classic, elegant, and sophisticated at the same time.

3) What subject matter appears most in your artwork? What do you love about that subject? What do you dislike?

The subject matter that appears most in my artwork are monarch butterflies. I am intrigued by the butterfly’s design and the beauty of their dramatic transformations in their short lived lifespan. I enjoy illustrating their stories and creating an imagery of permanence by using such a delicate subject matter. I wish they could live for hundreds of years and tell stories of their flights across mountains and seas.los angeles contemporary art

4) What is difficult for you about your chosen medium?

What is most difficult about using pen and ink is the amount of time that it takes to finish a piece, especially my large drawings but I really enjoy putting in all the tiny, little details. The end result is what makes it all worth it and shows that I truly love what I do.los angeles contemporary art

5) Do you have any secret talents or party tricks unrelated to your art making?

grew up on a small apple orchard where we grew green granny smith cooking apples. I love being in the kitchen and my spiced apples recipe is delicious. 

6) Which describes you: Beach, Forest, Desert, Field, or City?

The city is what best describes me right now. Although I grew up in the country where a lot of my inspiration for my work comes from, I have lived in the city of Richmond, Virginia, US for the past five years and it fits my busy lifestyle wonderfully.los angeles contemporary art

7) Any parting advice for budding artists?

Never stop creating and never lose sight of your beautiful imagination.

 

Do you create exceptional visual art and want to become a Los Angeles contemporary  art name too?

View our Call for Entries today:
http://linusgallery.com/call-for-entries/

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 Linus Galleries, Los Angeles Art Shows

2014 Artist Interview Series

Lorraine Bubar

Linus Gallery of Los Angeles  presents our second interview! The Artist Interview Series is a new blog  featuring contemporary Linus artists from a variety of different practices and backgrounds. The blog aims to be an enjoyable read, sharing insight into the artist’s creative process and workspace, as well as their view of the world around us. This week we feature Lorraine Bubar, whose process of papercut artworks we find truly fascinating and unique.

1) Please tell us your name, artistic practice of choice, and location in the world.

 I am Lorraine Bubar, a papercutting artist, writing from Los Angeles, California.

Los Angeles art gallery

2) Are you self taught or did you formally study art?

I was able to combine my passion for biology and art while studying at UCLA, with the idea of becoming a medical illustrator. While in college, I became intrigued with the idea of creating animated educational films, which led me to study and then work in the Animation Industry for many years. I have continued to incorporate my love and interest in nature, movement, and metamorphosis into my art. For many years I created and exhibited narrative paintings done with transparent watercolor. I am very excited that I am currently creating papercuts that incorporate my love of traveling and hiking. I began to experiment with papercutting when I realized that so many cultures around the world, from Japan, China, Mexico, and Eastern Europe utilize papercutting for diverse purposes, such as for calendars and for holiday celebrations. I am honoring these cultures by taking a decorative tradition and doing it with a more painterly technique. The intricate lacework of layered papers, from Asian countries where I have traveled, and the colors celebrate the beauty of the planet’s various ecosystems. My next journey will take me to Denali National Park, where I will be an Artist-In-Residence.

Los Angeles art gallery

3) What subject matter appears most in your artwork?

At first glance, my papercuts depict scenes of koi, birds, water lilies, and other flora and fauna in the unique natural environments that surround us. These pieces are created out of multiple layers of paper and include multiple layers of meaning in the compositions. I often create compositions that include the predators or the hierarchy of the species in that environment. I like that many traditional family trees were created out of paper cutting, capturing the hierarchy of generations in a family. I love any reference that I can make to the historical traditions of paper cutting.

Fine Art Gallery California

4) What is difficult for you about your chosen medium?

This medium is very time consuming, at least the way that I approach it. The number one question that people ask me is “How long do these take you?” I would rather people ask me other questions, rather than focusing on time. I do not really think how long these take, because I get absorbed in the process and get excited to watch them evolve, especially as I introduce new colors into the compositions. I also find it difficult that people often do not know what they are looking at when they are exhibited. I am delighted when I see someone walking up closely to them and commenting, “Wow, these are made out of paper!” From a distance some often look like color wood block prints, but upon observing them closely, the depth and texture of the paper is apparent.

Fine Art Gallery California

5) Do you have any secret talents unrelated to your art making?

The secret talent that I have that seems unrelated, but is related, is running. I am passionate about running. I ran my first marathon five years ago. Besides enjoying running, the people that I have met through running, and the races that I have participated in, I have learned a lot by running marathons. A few of the things that I have learned are that there is a big mental component to doing something that is very challenging and that one often needs to “dig deep” to reach one’s goal. I have also learned that it is very important to always have new challenges set, and to enjoy the people along the journey.

Artist Lorraine with her pet tortoise.

Los Angeles art gallery

6) What do you think the future of your medium will look like for others artists or as a whole?

The more that images are computer generated and the more digital images that I see, the more attracted I am to things that are obviously made by hand. I am delighted that I am developing a decorative tradition into an artistic one. I am delighted that I see many other artists working with paper in such diverse and creative ways. I am delighted by my personal connection to other cultures and to a heritage of working in a medium that children and adults created with only simple tools, for diverse purposes. I like to think that it is obvious that I am crossing the boundaries of culture, art, and craft. I hope that there are more ways for people to connect to their own cultural heritages, as I did when I discovered that Eastern European Jews created papercuts to mark holidays and daily rituals. I hope that there will continue to be ways for people to make artistic connections.

Los Angeles art gallery

7) Any parting advice for budding artists?

I create my art by using an x-acto knife. I often feel like I was on the knife blade’s edge when I am questioning something in the composition: making a change , adding something, trying some other crazy color combination. Whenever I hesitate, question myself, and fear “messing it up,” I feel great when I go ahead and do the thing that I was questioning. I love taking risks and following my instincts, and overriding the worries about “messing up.” I think of it as being on that knife blade’s edge, and making the cut! Take the risk!–in whatever, your art or your life.

Do you create exceptional contemporary artwork and want to submit for Los Angeles art shows?

View our Call for Entries today:
http://linusgallery.com/call-for-entries/

Keep up with our news and updates with all of our following social media sites:

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 Linus Galleries, Los Angeles Contemporary Gallery

2014 Artist Interview Series

Dan Pyle

Linus Gallery Artist Interview Series is a new blog  featuring Linus artists from a variety of different practices and backgrounds. The blog aims to be an enjoyable read, sharing insight into the artist’s creative process and workspace, as well as their view of the world around us!

1) Please tell us your name, artistic practice of choice, and location in the world.

 I am Dan Pyle.  I live in West Hollywood, California. I work exclusively in charcoal, in a photo realistic style.

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2) This is a hard choice for many visual artists, but what is the first answer that comes to mind when you think of your favorite color?

   Since I work in charcoal, I see everything as gray, so I enjoy colors, outside of my work & my most favorite color in the whole world is periwinkle blue (lavender blue).

Los Angeles Contemporary Gallery

3) What subject matter appears most in your artwork? What do you love about that subject? What do you dislike?

I really split my subjects between figures & vintage objects.  The figures give me a chance to create something strong or soft or dramatic.  The objects let me create a memory or nostalgia.  The thing I don’t like about figures is that they are more undefined than an object, so I have to pay close attention to anatomy & sometimes see small details & shadows that may not have been captured in the photo I am working from.  Objects are very defined.  The only thing I don’t like about the vintage objects is trying to find good subjects that people can relate to & if they are broken or distressed, even though that makes them more interesting, it also makes them harder to draw.

 

Los Angeles Contemporary gallery

4) What is difficult for you about your chosen medium?

I use a lot of sharp contrast & shadows & negative space in my compositions, so keeping the surface clean is difficult—-especially if I have left large areas of clean white background.  Also drawing extremely small details is hard, unless I blow up the subject quite large.

5) Do you have any secret talents or party tricks unrelated to your art making?

I actually do a lot of baking.  Desserts mostly—cakes, pies, cookies, brownies.  I have been baking all the birthday cakes at work in the last 4 jobs I have held (almost 30 years).  It’s another form of creativity for me.  My mother is German & was raised on German cooking & my dad was from the south, raised on rich southern cooking.  So I have had a lot of influence.

Los Angeles Contemporary Gallery

6) Which describes you: Beach, Forest, Desert, Field, or City?

I am 50% beach & 50% forest.

Los Angeles Contemporary gallery

7) Any parting advice for budding artists?

Any young artists looking to get into the serious art world should have a website, where people can find them.  I also suggest entering competitions & contests—even if you don’t win, your work is being seen by judges & people in the industry who may remember you.  Donate a piece of your art to a charity auction….someone is going to go home with that piece of art & others will see it.  Exposure & networking are key ingredients for getting your foot in the door.

los-angeles-contemporary-gallery-dan-pyle-02

 

Do you create exceptional contemporary artwork and want to become a Los Angeles contemporary gallery artist too?

View our Call for Entries today:
http://linusgallery.com/call-for-entries/

Keep up with our news and updates with all of our following social media sites:

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Silent Communication Art Show Artist Portraits

Los Angeles fine art photographer, Linnea Lenkus, uses her curatorial expertise to bring together a diverse collection of artists to show at our contemporary art gallery. Her selection of artists is narrowed down to artwork that pushes boundaries and leaves a lasting impression. As our last 2013 art show, Lenkus presented “Silent Communication”. As part of the artists participation, they were also photographed by Lenkus in a one-on-one portrait photography session. These artist portraits are a continuation to her Artist Portrait Series, a project in the making for future presentation at Linus. Lenkus specializes in fine art photography for all stages of people’s lives. Her two portrait studio locations are in Long Beach and Pasadena.

Digital artist Marcos Armitaje, submitted intricate photographs of crystal waves found within the interior of precious crystals. The abstract formations require a closer look in order to fully grasp the beauty captured through Armitaje’s lens. Although these particular photographs are of miniature size, this doesn’t take away from the compelling message the artist transmits through nature’s aesthetic treasures.

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Armitaje’s artwork (5 small pieces on the right) presented at our “Silent Communication” art show.

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Marcos Armitaje photographed by Linnea Lenkus.

Marcos Armitaje, a contemporary digital artist from Venezuela, has painstakingly perfected the distinctive technique of capturing digital images of heat passing through natural earth minerals and crystals. Here digitally printed in luminous colors on metal and canvas, are the waves of “light” that are completely invisible to the naked eye and thus, cannot be detected by any other means. Crystalwave Art by Marcos Armitaje is one of a kind! Through this unique art form, you are experiencing firsthand the natural waves that native minerals emanate from the deepest part of the invisible spectrum.

Mr. Armitaje has sold works at the James Ratliff Gallery in Sedona, AZ, the Del Mar Art Center Gallery and at the La Jolla Art Association Gallery in La Jolla, CA. His works have been juried in to many shows, including the Museum of Computer Art in New York, the San Diego Art Institute, the San Diego Art Department, the Coastal Artists association of Solana Beach, CA, the Buenaventura Art Association in Ventura, the Studio Channel Islands Gallery in Camarillo, the Linus Gallery in Pasadena and many more. He recently completed large showings at galleries in Santa Fe, NM and at Bergamot Station in Santa Monica, CA. In April, 2011, Marcos’ piece “LaSelva” won the $1000 Collector’s Award at the San Diego Art Institute 51st Annual International Exhibition.

Los Angeles photographers

Portrait of Marcos Armitaje taken by Linnea Lenkus.

“My art is not simply the expression of feeling or commitment into the material world where we reside. On the contrary, it is at its essence, the forced sequestration of electromagnetic radiation not visible to the human eye. The Crystalwave Art you observe here now on canvas, has bathed your corporal being since before you were born. I present to you here and now, the fossil radiation you have always innately known.”

- Marcos Armitaje

 

 

 

Are you interested in becoming a Linus Galleries artist? We have a ton of information on our art gallery website and post new call for entries all of the time. Sign up for our newsletter and join us on FacebookGoogle Plus,  Twitter and Pintrest.

Art Gallery Silent Communication Artist Portraits

 

Photographed by Linnea Lenkus, photography and mixed media artist Bill Hornaday, wowed with his artwork accepted for “Silent Communication”. His fine art photography Aqua Terra 20, colorfully lit up the collection at our contemporary art gallery. This piece plays with elements of light, color, and reflection in order to fully grasp the beauty found in nature. As you stare into his photograph, it is possible to get lost in the ripples of color as they transform from real objects to abstract figures.

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Bill Hornaday’s artwork presented at our art show “Silent Communication”.

In conjunction with our recent live art show, Los Angeles fine art photographer and curator at Linus Galleries, Linnea Lenkus, has continued her Artist Portrait Series in an effort to encourage artists to view our contemporary art gallery as a welcoming resource for their future artistic endeavors. Lenkus’ portraits of the participating artists show how comfortable these photography sessions were in order to truly capture every individual’s unique personality. Lenkus is a seasoned photographer creating family portrait photography, infant photography, boudoir photography, and much more for all stages of people’s lives.

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Bill Hornaday photographed by Linnea Lenkus.

Artist Bio:

Bill Hornaday is a BFA graduate from UCLA, where he attended both the Art and Film Schools. Bill worked in the film industry for many years, for Columbia Pictures and Avco Embassy Pictures among other companies. He has worked intermittently as a photographer since film school and as always used the camera as a form of artistic expression. Since 2005, Bill has been devoting himself full-time to photography and photography-related mixed media. Bill’s interest recently has concentrated on the reflections of light and color to create abstractions, and using these abstractions to photographically “paint” a picture through the lens. He does not use any filters whatsoever to abstract his images, but captures these photo-paintings directly from nature. He has been shown at the Smithsonian, and in galleries in Carmel, Palo Alto, Bethesda and Santa Cruz.

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Hornaday’s portrait taken by Lenkus.

 

 

 

Are you interested in becoming a Linus Galleries artist? We have a ton of information on our art gallery website and post new call for entries all of the time. Sign up for our newsletter and join us on FacebookGoogle Plus,  Twitter and Pintrest.

 

 

 

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