Linus Galleries, Fine Art Gallery

2014 Artist Interview Series

Jeremy Brooks

Linus Galleries, a Los Angeles contemporary art gallery, presents The Artist Interview Series. Our Linus artists are from all over the world and come from a variety of different practices and backgrounds. Read on to gain insight into the creative process and personality of our featured artist. This week we feature artist Jeremy Brooks who recently exhibited one of his pieces for our Queer exhibition.

 

My name is Jeremy R. Brooks.  I am a (ceramic) sculptor and collagist residing in Carbondale, IL where I teach as a Visiting Assistant Professor in the ceramics department at Southern Illinois University.  My background is in the ceramic arts, and while I do have a fondness for finely crafted objects through the malleability of clay, I have a parallel yet equal interest in found objects, images, and materials that are very much “away” from the hand / handicraft.  As such, both the found and the fabricated greatly inform my studio practice.

Jeremy Brooks

Secret Agent – Jeremy Brooks

Are you self taught or did you formally study art?

I received my BFA in art and design from Grand Valley State University in 2001, and my MFA in ceramic art from Alfred University in 2007.  I studied under Daleene Menning while I was an undergrad student, and I studied under Anne Currier, Andrea Gill, John Gill, Wayne Higby, Walter McConnell, and Linda Sikora during my graduate studies.  My older sister, Melanie Brooks, is a ceramic artist as well, and she also inspired me at a very young age to pursue a career as a maker.

What subject matter appears most in your artwork? What do you love about that subject? What do you dislike?

As a gay man, themes of gay culture and aspects queer theory appear most frequently in my work.  What do I love about the subject?  The men… all of the men.  What do I dislike? The fact that it definitely narrows my viewing audience.  The very definition of the work queer, however, is something that is unusual, hence it will never have mass appeal and will cater to a smaller audience.

As a ceramic craftsmen, materiality or “ceramicness” is always on my mind.  What do I love about the subject?  Getting dirty – both physically and conceptually.  What do I dislike?  Again, the fact that it definitely narrows my viewing audience.  “Nerd-ing” out over the material based ceramics is typically only embraced by fellow clay heads and material junkies.

Jeremy Brooks

Work in progress
‘The Jolly Green Giant’

 

What colors or mediums do you fear or avoid using?

Regarding the use of color in my work, while I do not consider myself to be chromophobic by any means, the color purple is one that I use rather infrequently.  I do have plans, however, to start using purple pansy flowers as ornament in some upcoming collages.  Regarding mediums that I avoid using in my studio practice, I have employed a lot of mixed media and material finishes on ceramic wares in the past that are not as archival as I hoped they would be such as textured spray paint, flocking, wax, soap, and fragrance.  I have been making strong efforts to work with more archival materials / finishes in my recent work so that the work is less ephemeral.  My recent works that utilizes ceramic decal collages on commercial porcelain plates and canvases grew out of this concern, and these works are some of the most archival pieces that I have produced to date.

Jeremy Brooks

Work in progress
‘He’s My Lady’

Jeremy Brooks

Work in progress
‘I’m Not Touching You Distance Makes The Heart Grow Fonder’

 

Have you ever gone through a period of “quitting art”?

I have not gone through a period of quitting art.  I have gone through periods of time when making work was not possible due to a lack of facilities (for the production of ceramic work specifically) or due to a lack of funds in general.  In order to stay active, I was left to find new avenues for my creative output, which actually expanded upon my lexicon of a visual language in my studio practice.

Jeremy Brooks

Work in progress
‘Peeler’

Jeremy Brooks

Work in progress
‘The Mollebos’

Which artist living or dead would you want to have drink with? What would the drink be?

If i could have a drink with any artist living or dead it would be Johann Friedrich Böttger, a German alchemist who is credited with being the first European to discover the formula of porcelain.  The drink would be a porcelain slip which we would analyze rather than consume.  I would hope by the end of the chat he would perform some slight of hand trick to turn the drink into gold.

Jeremy Brooks

Work in progress
‘Head Bone’

Where would you like to travel?

One day I hope to travel to the Meissen Factory in Germany because of my interest in the history of porcelain and the work of Johann Friedrich Böttger and Johan Joachim Kaendler.  While in Europe, I would also like to visit several of the other porcelain factories as well including the Sèvres Porcelain Factory in France.

Jeremy BrooksJeremy Brooks

 

Linus Galleries, Fine Art Gallery

2014 Artist Interview Series

Paul Glenn

Linus Galleries, a Los Angeles contemporary art gallery, presents The Artist Interview Series. Our Linus artists are from all over the world and come from a variety of different practices and backgrounds. Read on to gain insight into the creative process and personality of our featured artist. This week we feature artist Paul Glen who recently exhibited several of his stunning pattern/decorative pieces for our Traditions exhibition.

1) Please tell us your name, artistic practice of choice, and location in the world.

My name is Paul Evan Glenn, I’m a painter currently residing in  San Francisco.

Los Angeles art gallery

Paul Glen at work in his studio.

 

2) Are you self taught or did you formally study art?

I studied at Brandeis University for my undergraduate degree in painting and received my MFA from Rhode Island School of Design.

 

3) What did everyone else think you would be when you grew up?

Probably something in the healthcare industry.

Los Angeles art gallery

Studio shot of works in progress.

Los Angeles art gallery

View from his Studio

4) What subject matter appears most in your artwork? What do you love about that subject? What do you dislike?

Geometric Patterns and markings taken from religious textiles, objects or texts. It is a never ending resource for painting and drawing. I love it all. My artwork is based on the structure of ritual. Ritual requires pattern and faith. My daily exercise of mark making is a practice of my own personal prayers. This process is a ritual that reminds me of living in the present. Living in the present moment brings great power and joy rather than fearing the future or regretting the past.

Los Angeles art gallery

“Blue Prayer”
Colored Pencil

 

Los Angeles art gallery

“Daily Prayer Carpet”
Colored Pencil


5) Have you ever gone through a period of “quitting art”?

Yes. I stopped painting for 8 years while working as a real estate broker in New York. It was very hard to paint and be a broker at the same time. Thank God being a painter won.

Los Angeles art gallery

Work in progress

6) Which artist living or dead would you want to have drink with? What would the drink be?

Bridget Riley. Tea.

Bridget Riley by Ida Kar

Portrait of Bridget Riley by Ida Kar

 

7) Where would you like to travel?

I love European museums. The National Gallery in London is my all time favorite. But the Van Gogh museum is a really close second.

 

8) How do you unwind?

Some form of music usually can calm my mind.

Los Angeles art gallery

“Red Prayer”
Colored Pencil

 

9) And finally, what have you created in your life, visual arts aside, that you are most proud of ?

I can make an amazing chocolate cake.

 

 

If you are interested in purchasing artwork from this artist or any of the artists featured on this blog or our website please  CONTACT the GALLERY

Visit our Call for Entries and Gallery Website

Keep up with our news and updates with all of our following social media sites:

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Pintrest

Linus Galleries, Fine Art Gallery

2014 Artist Interview Series

Justin Yanke

Linus Galleries, a Los Angeles contemporary art gallery, presents The Artist Interview Series. Our Linus artists are from all over the world and come from a variety of different practices and backgrounds. Read on to gain insight into the creative process and personality of our featured artist. This week we feature photorealism painter Justin Yanke who recently exhibited one of his incredible and witty self portraits for our Humor exhibition.

1) Please tell us your name, artistic practice of choice, and location in the world.

My name is Justin Yanke and I currently practice the art of Photorealism in the San Francisco Bay Area.

los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter

Justin Yanke in his studio.

2) Are you self taught or did you formally study art?

My infantile desire to scratch something recognizable onto a surface has been honed to it’s current state by a consistent push for self discovery through discipline. Earning my BFA and MFA only gave me the courage to continue on this path.
los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painterlos angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter
3) What did everyone else think you would be when you grew up?
Growing up, isolation shielded me from the condescending judgment of my peers. While my parents supported anything I was doing, under their watch, the rest of the world could only guess at what I was made of.
los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter

los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter

A process shot of ‘Liz Submerged’

4) What subject matter appears most in your artwork? What do you love about that subject? What do you dislike?

Myself. With what started as an ease of effort in finding good subject matter, my face has become the go-to topic when all else ceases to inspire. Age is always working to shed light onto the value of such a subject by evolving it into something different from the time before, but the frequency of this visual diary may have taken a toll on my self identity. As my tools and techniques become more precise, the final creation is always at war with my perceived vision and the truth only nature can know.
los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter

Justin’s painting process in eight stages

los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter

5) What is difficult for you about your chosen medium?
Although the outcome appears “photorealistic”, in the sense that your eyes are interpreting sight harmoniously, my marks are under constant scrutiny. There does exist levels of observation within my work that can displease a particular eye. The natural tendency to expose such caverns of rendered confusion may have the ability to place the spectator somewhere above the art and undermine the artist’s intent.
los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter

Details of painting the eye, from ‘Liz Submerged’

 

 
6)  This is a hard choice for many visual artists, but what is the first answer that comes to mind when you think of your favorite color?

I find refuge in teal blue. Incandescent light is constantly attacking my photo references and I can always count on teal blue to balance things out.

los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painterlos angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter

los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter

‘Liz Submerged’
Oil Painting
48″ x 72″
by Justin Yanke

 

7) Which artist living or dead would you want to have drink with?

Francis Bacon, assuming we are drinking alcohol.
los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter
8) Do you have any secret talents or party tricks unrelated to your art making?
 That depends on what’s at stake.
los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter

Look familiar? This is Justin’s graphite remake of Chuck Close’s infamous “Big Self Portrait”.
Chuck Close Copy
18″ x 24″
Justin Yanke

 

9) What musical artist/band are you currently listening to when you are creating?
Tom Waits and Charles Bukowski never let me down.
 
los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter

Walnut
Oil Painting
36″ x 36″
by Justin Yanke

10) What do you think the future of your medium will look like for other artists or as a whole?
 In the future, I can only hope for a total disregard for what we now call “Photorealism”.
11) Any parting advice for budding artists?
Stop looking for shortcuts!
los angeles, linus galleries, photorealism painter

A palette is ready for his next artwork

If you are interested in purchasing artwork from this artist or any of the artists featured on this blog or our website please  CONTACT the GALLERY

Visit our Call for Entries and Gallery Website

Keep up with our news and updates with all of our following social media sites:

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Pintrest

Linus Galleries, Fine Art Gallery

2014 Artist Interview Series

Jim Baab

Linus Galleries, a Los Angeles contemporary art gallery, presents The Artist Interview Series. Our Linus artists are from all over the world and come from a variety of different practices and backgrounds. Read on to gain insight into the creative process and personality of our featured artist. This week we feature artist Jim Baab who recently exhibited one of his stunning figure studies and nude fine art portraits for our Undressed exhibition.

los angeles, linus galleries, figure studies

Ripple Thief
by Jim Baab

 

1) Please tell us your name, artistic practice of choice, and location in the world.

Hello! My name is Jim Baab. My artistic practice is photography. I reside on Prospect Hill, in Somerville, Massachusetts.

los angeles, linus galleries, figure studies

A portrait of Jim, who embraces using a camera phone regularly to make photographs.

2) Are you self taught or did you formally study art?

I am self taught. I do not hold an advanced degree. My background is in film and video production and digital media technical support. Around the time I was in the third grade, along with a handful of my peers, I was introduced to the traditional, chemical darkroom process of developing and printing film by our school’s principal. But, I did not get to experience that magic again, until my last semester of college. I currently shoot with an 8 megapixel Olympus DSLR and an iPhone 4s – not high-end gear. About three years ago, I jumped head-first into photographing nudes by working with ZoeFest XI, an annual gathering of photographers and models coordinated by Figuremodels.org founder Zoe Wiseman. Since then, I have participated in two annual Somerville Open Studios events and taken three “human landscape” workshops offered by Karin Rosenthal.

los angeles, linus galleries, figure studies

Forward and Back
2014 Undressed Linus Galleries Exhibition
by Jim Baab

3) What did everyone else think you would be when you grew up?

At 44 years of age, I have not grown up yet – both, a curse and a blessing. My father, a machinist, wanted me to be an engineer. After enjoying drafting and design in high school, it was decided that I would study residential architecture in college. I eventually switched to film production, knowing it was a form of communication that fed my creative side more than drafting and design.

los angeles, linus galleries, figure studies

Jim’s pictures often highlight similarities between the human figure and landscapes.

4) What subject matter appears most in your artwork? What do you love about that subject? What do you dislike?

The subject matter that appears most in my artwork may be the natural world, or humanity’s connection to it – birds, nudes in the landscape, nudes as landscape, fresh garden vegetables, vegetables as a nude human form. As an observer, I enjoy noticing the patterns, lines, shadows, alignments and pauses that occur in my surroundings. Magic, beauty and tragedy is happening everywhere but most people are too distracted to notice. As a human, I dislike that. As an artist, I can present unique perspectives that reconnect viewers with their surroundings.

los angeles, linus galleries, figure studies

Vegetarian Nude
by Jim Baab

5) What is difficult for you about your chosen medium?

My chosen medium is not that difficult. There are technical hurdles and hidden costs. Accurately pricing artwork that is reproducible and easy to promote and steal digitally can be challenging. The most difficult part is knowing when digital work is done and when to move on.

los angeles, linus galleries, figure studies

Separation
by Jim Baab

6) This is a hard choice for many visual artists, but what is the first answer that comes to mind when you think of your favorite color?

Blue. Blue skies. Blue jeans. Blueberries. Robin’s egg blue.

los angeles, linus galleries, figure studies

Beautiful shadows mid-shoot

7) Which artist living or dead would you want to have drink with?

Ernest Hemingway. I’ve heard he was good at it.

los angeles, linus galleries, figure studies

Contact
by Jim Baab

8) Do you have any secret talents or party tricks unrelated to your art making?

I know how to repair a slate roof and I enjoy cooking. I’ve never mastered anything. But, I enjoy being artistic in my approach to just about everything.

9) What musical artist/band are you currently listening to when you are creating?

I listen to everything from Bille Holiday to Foo Fighters. When I shoot there is, usually, no music. If I’m editing photos in Lightroom on my computer, streaming Jazz happens a lot.

los angeles, linus galleries, figure studies

Untitled
by Jim Baab

10) What do you think the future of your medium will look like for other artists or as a whole?

That’s a great question. Digital photography technology, on all fronts, is constantly improving as the Impossible Project’s Polaroid-friendly film, Instagram and similar mobile apps are making retro imagery fun again. But, as wearable cameras and devices become smaller and more integrated with the wearer’s vitals and activities, we may be seeing a stream of artwork that turns traditional subjects on their heads. I believe artists and hackers will still find ways to make the old new again, though.

My own focus, this year, has been submitting my work to calls for art and contests. So far, my photography has been selected for group exhibitions in Massachusetts, Vermont, Tenseness and California.  I was also recently chosen for ArtAscent magazine’s Volume 8 Gold Artist Award, which included the publication and review of new “human landscape” work. It has been a good year to learn the process of finding outlets for my artwork, including the production of two books that I will be submitting to a photobook exhibition, this Fall.

Los Angeles art gallery

Fountainhead
by Jim Baab

11) Any parting advice for budding artists?
Find inspiration in other artists’ work. Think about how they are producing what moves you. Find and explore your own process. Be open to failure, criticism and compliments – each is an opportunity to grow.

 

If you are interested in purchasing artwork from this artist or any of the artists featured on this blog or our website please  CONTACT the GALLERY

Visit our Call for Entries and Gallery Website

Keep up with our news and updates with all of our following social media sites:

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Pintrest

Linus Galleries, Fine Art Gallery

2014 Artist Interview Series

Anthony Lazorko

Linus Galleries, a Los Angeles contemporary art gallery, presents The Artist Interview Series. Our Linus artists are from all over the world and come from a variety of different practices and backgrounds. Read on to gain insight into the creative process and personality of our featured artist. This week we feature Anthony Lazorko who recently exhibited one of his colorful, charming woodcut prints  in our Dream State exhibition.

1) Please tell us your name, artistic practice of choice, and location in the world.

I’m Anthony ‘Tony’ Lazorko and I am a printmaker living in Mesilla, New Mexico. Although I have made my living in commercial art all my life, the love of printmaking has always been a big part of my life. A few years ago I retired from my job as Art Director of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and have begun again to make prints.

los angeles, linus galleries, woodcut print

A portrait of Anthony Lazorko

2) Are you self-taught or did you formally study art?

I received four years of fine arts education, 1956-1960, at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. There I studied drawing, oil painting and printmaking under the tutelage of such prestigious artists as Morris Blackburn, Walter Stumpfig and Franklin Watkins. The focus of my work has always been to depict something about the American experience, no matter how ordinary, and to say it in an aesthetic manner with tactile surfaces, color and composition.

los angeles, linus galleries, woodcut print

“19 and nine-tenths”
Woodcut Print

3) This is a hard choice for many visual artists, but what is the first answer that comes to mind when you think of your favorite color?

Maybe blue but green in all its variety.

los angeles, linus galleries, woodcut print

“Xmas Eve on the Avenue”
Woodcut Print
Linus Galleries 2014 Dream State Exhibition

4) Where do you create your art?

In my imagination, day dreaming and from what I see around me. My wife, Marguerite Biddle, and I purchased a small house and studio in Mesilla, New Mexico, where we are busy working. She and I were fellow students at the Academy.

los angeles, linus galleries, woodcut print

Printer Edgar Ivar Rincon assists Anthony “Tony” Lazarko.

5) What is difficult for you about your chosen medium?

Errors are time consuming to resolve. My woodcuts are multi-color, involving many separate blocks. I always pull my own prints so the whole process is quite time-consuming. Therefore, I do not like to send them out to galleries unless there is real interest.

los angeles, linus galleries, woodcut print

6) What trends bother you?

Personal “mental dramas” on paper or canvas tend to bother me.

los angeles, linus galleries, woodcut print

“Temple Chevron”
Woodcut Print

7) Describe your “aha” moment when working with your medium that made you make that leap into another level. Or does that feel like it is yet to occur?

It’s always elusive, but you know it when it happens.

los angeles, linus galleries, woodcut print

“Let’s Eat!”
Woodcut Print

 

8) How do you unwind your brain?

To relax I like to read or watch baseball on TV.

los angeles, linus galleries, woodcut print

Tony’s cat naps in the artist’s workspace.

9) What musical artist/band are you currently listening to when you are creating?

Bach, Classical music., and sometimes jazz.

los angeles, linus galleries, woodcut print

“Moonlit Hotel”
Woodcut Print

10) Any parting advice for budding artists?

To help pay for my tuition I was a print monitor for three years at the behest of Morris Blackburn (see question #2).

It takes a dogged effort, don’t give up.

 

If you are interested in purchasing artwork from this artist or any of the artists featured on this blog or our website please  CONTACT the GALLERY

Visit our Call for Entries and Gallery Website

Keep up with our news and updates with all of our following social media sites:

Facebook

Twitter

Google +

Pintrest

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